The Worry Cure

The following exercises are from Dale Carnegie’s book “The Worry Cure.”

To get straight to the point, no one wants to worry more than they have to. It isn’t good for our health and it doesn’t help us solve problems very much, though it might help us identify that there is a problem.

In the book the 5th Discipline they coined the concepts “emotional tension” vs. “creative tension” which is essentially what Dale’s worry cure teaches: Get out of emotional tension by getting creative and making action plan steps to solve your problem.

downloadPractice 1: Three Rules

 

Rule 1) If you want to avoid worry, do what Sr. William Osler did: Live in “day-tight compartments”. Don’t stew about the future. Just live each day until bedtime.

Rule 2) The next time trouble backs you up in a corner, try the magic formula of Willis H. Farrier:

a) Ask yourself, “what is the worst that can possible happen if I can’t solve my problem?”

b) Prepare yourself mentally to accept the worst – if necessary.

c) Then calmly try to improve upon the worst – which you have already mentally agreed to accept.

Rule 3) Remind yourself of the exorbitant price you can pay for worry in terms of your health. “Those who do not know how to fight worry die young.”

downloadPractice 2: Get the facts straight

 

If a person devotes their time to securing facts in an impartial, objective way, their worries will usually evaporate in the light of knowledge. Half of worry is caused by people trying to make decisions without facts.

a) When collecting facts, pretend your doing so for some other person

b) Pretend you are a lawyer arguing both sides to a case, even those you don’t like to face

1) write down what you are worrying about

2) write down what you can do about it

3) decide what to do

4) Start immediately to carry out that decision

downloadPractice 3: Say a prayer

 

“God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.”

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s